Quick Recap & Today’s Final Jeopardy – June 1, 2016

Today’s contestants:

Liz Miles, a doctoral candidate in anthropology from New Haven, CT
wk38_0530_0603_miles_lineup
Kelly Bayles, a librarian from Tulsa, OK
wk38_0530_0603_bayles_lineup
Tim Mercure, a graduate student in mathematics from Washington, DC (1-day total: $20,401)
wk38_0530_0603_mercure_lineup

Scores going into Final Jeopardy:
Kelly $16,900
Liz $7,600
Tim $4,200

Final Jeopardy! category: COLLEGE TEAM SPORTS

Final Jeopardy! clue: The USA’s first intercollegiate athletic event was in 1852 in this, which as a sport goes back to at least the Middle Ages

Click/Tap Here for Correct Response

What is rowing? (Incorrect responses, if any, and any game stats, can be found in the comments section.)

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Tim 4200 – 2601 = 1599
Liz 7600 – 3000 = 4600
Kelly 16900 – 0 = 16900

Who wore the Jeopardy! hat better: Philip Tiu’s Mr. Coco or my dog Bailey? Vote now!

From Harvard’s website:

Boat clubs at Harvard and Yale had existed since the early 1840s, but races against outside competition was rare. That all changed when Yale issued a challenge to Harvard “to test the superiority of the oarsmen of the two colleges.” Thus the oldest intercollegiate athletic event was born.

On August 3, 1852—in a two-mile race on the calm waters of Lake Winnipesaukee—Harvard and Yale battled like never before. Yale was represented by two boats, the Shawmut and the Undine, while Harvard rowed in the Oneida. Harvard won the inaugural race by about four lengths, earning a pair of black walnut oars as its prize. It seems that people right away knew this was going to be the start of something big for among the distinguished observers was General Franklin Pierce, the Democratic party nominee and native of nearby Hillsborough, who would be elected President later that year.

No further races were held between the schools until July 1855, when Yale issued another challenge. In a contest held on the Connecticut River in Springfield, Harvard made it two straight, winning by one minute and 38 seconds. Harvard and Yale met again in 1859 and 1860, but it wasn’t until 1864 that the Regatta became an annual event. Yale gained its first series win that year, taking the three-miler on Worcester’s Lake Quinsigamond by 42 seconds.


(contestant photo credit: jeopardy.com)

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3 Comments on "Quick Recap & Today’s Final Jeopardy – June 1, 2016"

  1. Andy Saunders | June 1, 2016 at 5:44 pm |

    Incorrect responses to Final:
    Tim: Javelin
    Liz: Fencing
    Kelly: Javelin

    Game Stats:
    Kelly: 16,600 Coryat, 18 correct, 2 incorrect, 31.48% in first on buzzer
    Liz: 7,600 Coryat, 11 correct, 0 incorrect, 18.52% in first on buzzer
    Tim: 9,200 Coryat, 16 correct, 5 incorrect, 35.19% in first on buzzer
    11 Triple Stumpers

    Tim Mercure, through 2 games:
    41 correct
    11 incorrect
    2/4 on Daily Doubles
    1/2 in Final Jeopardy
    39.64% in first on buzzer
    Average Coryat: $10,300

    Kelly Bayles, to win:
    2 games: 58.86%
    3: 34.65%
    4: 20.39%
    5: 12.00%
    6: 7.07%
    Avg. streak: 2.431 games.

    Liz’s dissertation has yet to be published. Its tentative title: “Changing Lives, Changed Men?: Heterosexual Masculinity in Postmainstream Japan”

  2. Can you send me the categories from tonight?

    • Andy Saunders | June 2, 2016 at 12:39 pm |

      NAME’S THE SAME
      “UCK”Y STUFF
      IVY LEAGUE
      THE MOVIE ACTOR’S ROLE
      PRESIDENTS FROM OHIO
      GEOGRAPHY IN RHYME

      WORLD OF POETRY
      LEFTOVERS
      THE 2015 IG NOBEL PRIZES
      EPONYMS
      TELE-NOVELAS
      “CL”ASSICAL MUSIC

Comments are closed.