Today’s Final Jeopardy – March 26, 2018


Here’s today’s Final Jeopardy (in the category Medieval Literature) for Monday, March 26, 2018 (Season 34, Episode 141):

The illustration seen here appeared in the second printed edition of this book, published in England in 1483

A woodcut illustration, as used during Final Jeopardy! on March 26, 2018.

(correct response beneath the contestants)


Today’s contestants:

Johnny Trutor, an instructional technologist from Colchester, Vermont
Johnny Trutor on Jeopardy!
Vicki Cole, a compliance technician from Denver, Colorado
Vicki Cole on Jeopardy!
Tristan Mohabir, a nonprofit associate director from Washington, DC (1-day total: $8,800)
Tristan Mohabir on Jeopardy!

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Correct response: What is The Canterbury Tales?


Did you know that you can now find game-by-game stats of everyone, including Austin Rogers, who has won 10 or more games on Jeopardy!, here on the site?


More information about Final Jeopardy:

William Caxton is known today as the first British printer, setting up his own printing press in London in 1476. One of his first books was the first printed edition of Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. A second edition, with woodcut illustrations, was published in 1483.

You can find more information about Caxton’s editions at the British Library.

I’m sure that a number of viewers who look at Clue of The Day were surprised by this. Of course, “Penelope Cruz” in the “My Country (Of Birth)” category was a clue in the Jeopardy! round.


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Looking to find out who won Jeopardy! today? Tonight’s results are below!

Scores going into Final:
Johnny $14,000
Vicki $2,800
Tristan $0


Tonight’s results:
Tristan $0
Vicki $2,800 – $2,800 = $0 (What is Beowulf?)
Johnny $14,000 + $0 = $14,000 (1-day total: $14,000) (What is Le Morte D’Arthur The Canterbury Tales?)


Johnny Trutor, today's Jeopardy! winner (for the March 26, 2018 episode.)


Scores after the Jeopardy! Round:
Johnny $8,000
Vicki $5,200
Tristan $5,000


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Opening break taken after: 15 clues


Daily Double locations:
1) SOUNDS LIKE MEAT $1000 (22nd pick)
Johnny 3800 +3800 (Tristan 3800 Vicki 2400)
2) AMERICAN POLITICAL HISTORY $1200 (4th pick)
Tristan 6200 -6200 (Johnny 8000 Vicki 5200)
3) O NO! $2000 (22nd pick)
Tristan 2800 -2800 (Johnny 12000 Vicki 2400)
Overall Daily Double Efficiency for this game: -100


Unplayed clues:
J! round: None!
DJ! Round: EMMYS FOR COMEDY $800, $1200, $1600 & $2000
Total $ Left On Board: $5,600


Game Stats:
Johnny $11,200 Coryat, 21 correct, 4 incorrect, 43.40% in first on buzzer
Vicki $2,800 Coryat, 9 correct, 2 incorrect, 18.87% in first on buzzer
Tristan $9,000 Coryat, 15 correct, 4 incorrect, 30.19% in first on buzzer
Combined Coryat Score: $23,000
Lach Trash: $12,000 (on 9 Triple Stumpers)
Coryat lost to incorrect responses (less double-correct responses): $13,400


Tristan Mohabir, final stats:
30 correct, 8 incorrect
29.09% in first on buzzer (32/110)
1/4 on Daily Doubles (Net Earned: -$10,000)
1/1 in Final Jeopardy
Average Coryat: $9,600


Johnny Trutor, stats to date:
22 correct, 4 incorrect
43.40% in first on buzzer (23/53)
1/1 on Daily Doubles (Net Earned: $3,800)
1/1 in Final Jeopardy
Average Coryat: $11,200


Johnny Trutor, to win:
2 games: 46.26%
3: 21.40%
4: 9.90%
5: 4.58%
6: 2.12%
Avg. streak: 1.861 games.


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9 Comments on "Today’s Final Jeopardy – March 26, 2018"

  1. I haven’t followed the NYT “Clue of the Day” that long, but are days with a FJ visual clue the only times that another clue is substituted? When I saw it early this morning I figured something was up.

    • Generally, yes. However, I’ve seen it with “controversial” Finals as well, but Manchester-by-the-Sea was Clue of the Day, and I’ve also seen clues with tangential visuals be Clue of the Day as well. The best way is to check J!6 for a category match.

  2. Howard Bell | March 26, 2018 at 8:42 pm |

    I turned on today’s program, March 26, during Final Jeopardy. I noticed that the returning winner, Mr. Mohabir, wasn’t present. What happened to him?

    I love the show. This is the time I’ve I visited your website. Thanks so much.

    • Any contestant who finishes Double Jeopardy with a score of $0 or below, by rule, does not participate in Final Jeopardy.

      (Mr. Mohabir missed a pair of True Daily Doubles in Double Jeopardy.)

  3. Did Alex say the final answer would be a video?

    • For the purposes of the show, any clue with a visual portion (whether that be a still or a moving image) is considered a video clue, as a video monitor is required in order to display it.

  4. Is a Triple Stumper later ruled correct, as when “spirit quest” was deemed acceptable for “vision quest,” still counted as a Triple Stumper in your stats?

    • A Triple Stumper later ruled correct counts as a correct response and not a Triple Stumper.
      However, a response originally ruled correct and overturned does count as a Triple Stumper for the purposes of the stats (as J! Archive also counts it as such.)

  5. I thought that was a deliberately misleading Final. Clearly, it’s a round table, which would lead many to think it had something to do with King Arthur. Sure, when you look at it after the fact, you don’t see any knights, something that might make you rethink your answer. But–give me a break!–even the first-published date of “Morte d’Arthur” is 1485. I’m as mad as hell, and I’m not going to take this anymore!

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