Today’s Final Jeopardy – April 13, 2018

Here’s today’s Final Jeopardy (in the category U.S. Place Names) for Friday, April 13, 2018 (Season 34, Episode 155):

It’s the only state named for a woman & whose capital is also named for a woman

(correct response beneath the contestants)


Today’s contestants:

Eric Thorpe, a senior at Dartmouth College from Laguna Niguel, California
Eric Thorpe on Jeopardy!
Alli Ross, a sophomore at Worcester Polytechnic Institute from Shrewsbury, Massachusetts
Alli Ross on Jeopardy!
Patricia Jia, a senior at the University of Pennsylvania from Fremont, California
Patricia Jia on Jeopardy!

Remember, this week, just like most Jeopardy! tournaments, the 4 best non-winning scores also advance to the semi-finals as wild cards!

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Correct response: What is Maryland?


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More information about Final Jeopardy:

Maryland was named such after King Charles I’s wife Queen Mary; its capital, Annapolis, was named after Anne, the wife of Lord Baltimore, who owned the colony of Maryland.

(Of course, Georgia was named after King George II.)


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Looking to find out who won Jeopardy! today? Tonight’s results are below!

Scores going into Final:
Eric $12,600
Alli $11,400
Patricia $1,600


Tonight’s results:
Patricia $1,600 – $1,600 = $0 (What is Wyoming???)
Alli $11,400 + $8,201 = $19,601 (Automatic Semi-Finalist)
Eric $12,600 – $800 = $11,800 (What is…Virginia)


Alli Ross, today's Jeopardy! winner (for the April 13, 2018 episode.)


Wild Card Standings:
Monday: Hannah Sage, $17,000 ($19,000, $3,200)
Tuesday: Dhruv Gaur, $23,312 ($22,800, $10,400)
Wednesday: Rishab Jain, $20,100 ($13,600, $2,800)
Thursday: Rebecca Rosenthal, $26,000 ($26,000, $3,600)
Friday: Alli Ross, $19,601 ($11,400, $6,600)
1) Thatcher Chonka, $21,599 ($10,800, $3,600)
2) William Scott, $19,999 ($15,800, $1,800)
3) Jordan Goodson, $12,399 ($6,200, $2,200)
4) Eric Thorpe, $11,800 ($12,600, $0)
5) Caroline Trammell, $6,600 ($11,600, $6,000)
6) Josie Bianchi, $4,550 ($2,300, $3,200)
7) Sheldon Lewis II, $4,200 ($11,200, $4,800)
8) Carsen Smith, $2,000 ($6,200, $1,400)
9) Harry Kioko, $400 ($600, $-600)
10) Patricia Jia, $0 ($1,600, $3,200)
Here’s the methodology behind the “% chance to advance” statistic.


Scores after the Jeopardy! Round:
Alli $6,600
Patricia $3,200
Eric $0


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Opening break taken after: 15 clues


Daily Double locations:
1) THE OCEANS $600 (20th pick)
Eric 2600 -1600 (Alli 3800 Patricia 2400)
2) 5 CHARACTERS IN SEARCH OF THEIR AUTHORS $1200 (17th pick)
Eric 10400 +1400 (Alli 10600 Patricia 2800)
3) INTERNAL RHYME TIME $1200 (26th pick)
Patricia 3600 -2400 (Eric 12600 Patricia 10600)
Overall Daily Double Efficiency for this game: -115


Unplayed clues:
J! round: None!
DJ! Round: None!
Total $ Left On Board: $0


Game Stats:
Alli $11,400 Coryat, 18 correct, 1 incorrect, 31.58% in first on buzzer
Eric $14,000 Coryat, 16 correct, 2 incorrect, 24.56% in first on buzzer
Patricia $4,000 Coryat, 9 correct, 3 incorrect, 19.30% in first on buzzer
Combined Coryat Score: $29,400
Lach Trash: $19,600 (on 15 Triple Stumpers)
Coryat lost to incorrect responses (less double-correct responses): $5,000


Alli Ross, stats to date:
19 correct, 1 incorrect
31.58% in first on buzzer (18/57)
0/0 on Daily Doubles
1/1 in Final Jeopardy
Average Coryat: $11,400


Eric Thorpe, stats to date:
16 correct, 3 incorrect
24.56% in first on buzzer (14/57)
1/2 on Daily Doubles (Net Earned: -$200)
0/1 in Final Jeopardy
Average Coryat: $14,000


Patricia Jia, stats to date:
9 correct, 4 incorrect
19.30% in first on buzzer (11/57)
0/1 on Daily Doubles (Net Earned: -$2,400)
0/1 in Final Jeopardy
Average Coryat: $4,000


Miscellaneous:

  • Had Eric been correct, a second-place score of $13,400 in the College tournament advances only 41.543% of the time. $11,800 advances only 24.344% of the time.

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22 Comments on "Today’s Final Jeopardy – April 13, 2018"

  1. A tough FJ to answer in 30 seconds, especially for anyone who tries to run through the list of states alphabetically.

    • I started with the east coast states and got Maryland in a few seconds.

    • OOPS. Obviously incorrect. But I’m still right, because what I should’ve said, South Carolina/Columbia, are definitely both women’s names.

      • South Carolina was named after King Charles.

        Note how there is a big difference between “woman’s name now” and “named after someone who was a woman”.

        There is only one answer to this clue, no matter how one tries to spin it.

  2. My mind instantly went to Virginia and… stopped. Incorrectly obviously. That was a tough FJ for once.

  3. Rod Featherlin | April 13, 2018 at 1:42 pm |

    In first round Allie answered triceratops, about a fossil related to avian. Wouldn’t that be pterodactyl

  4. Question: Do today’s contestants know the amounts from the earlier days? I would assume not, since that would seem to give them an unfair advantage in figuring out what to wager in FJ in order to snag a wild card spot, but I’ve always been curious about that [for all tournaments]. I beg your forgiveness if this has been asked & answered before. A casual Google search did not do it.

    • They definitely don’t get to watch the games leading up to their game, you’re right, that would be extremely unfair.

  5. Maurine Gutowski | April 13, 2018 at 4:50 pm |

    Are these College Tournament episodes taped far ahead of their broadcast dates as most of the ordinary competitions? Have they competed on the air before? If not, how are they selected for this Tournament?

    • They’re usually taped about a month in advance. All of the players are new to the show. The show holds a special college test and auditions in the fall to select 15 players and 1 alternate.

    • Not sure how far in advance they’re taped, but pretty sure you probably only get one shot. I would imagine they go through the ordinary audition process as long as they qualify. Being in college would seem to be a logical requirement, and there’s probably an age limit too. A 50 year old can be in college, but it would seem unfair to bring all that life experience with you.

    • Vader47000 | April 14, 2018 at 1:47 am |

      They have to be pretty recent as they had a question about Sam Rockwell winning an Oscar (so, after March 4)

  6. Zac Spiewak | April 13, 2018 at 8:12 pm |

    Final Question today – Wyoming is a girl’s name. One of the main characters in Robert Heilein’s “The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress” is Wyoming Knott, definitely a women if you know the story. -Z

  7. Zac Spiewak | April 13, 2018 at 8:21 pm |

    Andy Saunders – Thank you for the clarification.

  8. How about Washington, as in Martha Washington and Olympia Dukakis? (Granted, I’m being slightly facetious, but the clue didn’t say it had to be a first name.)

    • Each state and capital, though, has an accepted name origin. And Maryland-Annapolis, by those generally accepted name origins, is the only correct response to the clue.

  9. I thought North Carolina, with Charlotte, also qualified for FJ?

  10. Maurine Gutowski | April 14, 2018 at 6:52 am |

    The Washington State capital certainly did NOT get its name from Olympia Dukakis, who was born in 1931, and Washington became a state in 1889. Associated names are the beautiful
    Olympic Mountains of which Mount Olympus is the highest point on the Olympic Peninsula, which lies west of Seattle, where I spent many (happy) years studying.

  11. Aren’t the Dakotas named for Dakota Fanning?

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