Today’s Final Jeopardy – January 11, 2019


Here’s today’s Final Jeopardy (in the category Famous Doctors) for Friday, January 11, 2019 (Season 35, Episode 90):

Not an artist himself, he inspired the Surrealists but thought them “absolute cranks” until he met Dali in London in 1938

(correct response beneath the contestants)


Today’s contestants:

Jocelyn Martich, a retired operations manager from Greensboro, North Carolina
Jocelyn Martich on Jeopardy!
Sarah Ann, a library research professional from San Diego, California
Sarah Ann on Jeopardy!
Anneke Garcia, an instructional design consultant from Salt Lake City, Utah (1-day total: $25,601)
Anneke Garcia on Jeopardy!

The Jeopardy! Book of Answers is out now! Here’s my review.

Are you going on the show and looking for information about how to bet in Final Jeopardy? Check out my new Betting Strategy 101 page!

I recently updated my tournament wild card models with as much tournament data that I’ve been able to find! If you’re playing in a tournament, you’ll want to check this out!

---Advertisement---

(Content continues below)

If you appreciate the work I do here on The Jeopardy! Fan and would like to make a one-time contribution to the site, you may do so here!


Correct response: Who is Sigmund Freud?


Did you know that you can now find game-by-game stats of everyone, including Austin Rogers, who has won 10 or more games on Jeopardy!, here on the site?


More information about Final Jeopardy:

Because the Surrealists generally believed in engaging the unconscious aspects of the mind for creativity, Sigmund Freud quickly became the “patron saint” of the group, and Salvador Dali even painted a portrait of Freud (seen below).

A portrait by Salvador Dali of Sigmund Freud, the subject of Final Jeopardy! on January 11, 2019.

Dali had made a few attempts to meet Freud in Vienna but was unable to, and only met Freud in London in 1938. The Freud Museum London currently has an exhibition running until next month about Freud’s influence on Dali and their London meeting.


There’s always something new coming into The Jeopardy! Fan Online Store, including something perfect for Boston baseball fans! Here are our top-selling items!


Looking to find out who won Jeopardy! today? Tonight’s results are below!

Scores going into Final:
Anneke $21,400
Jocelyn $18,400
Sarah $6,000


Tonight’s results:
Sarah $6,000 – $5,000 = $1,000 (Who is [sad kitty])
Jocelyn $18,400 – $10,000 = $8,400 (Who is Dr?)
Anneke $21,400 – $9,300 = $12,100 (Who is Dr. Dali) (2-day total: $37,701)


Anneke Garcia, today's Jeopardy! winner (for the January 11, 2019 game.)


Scores after the Jeopardy! Round:
Sarah $6,800
Anneke $4,600
Jocelyn $4,400


---Advertisement---


Opening break taken after: 15 clues


Daily Double locations:
1) GOING “DUTCH” $1000 (30th pick)
Sarah 3800 +3000 (Anneke 4600 Jocelyn 4400)
2) U.N. NAMEABLE $1200 (21st pick)
Jocelyn 7200 +3000 (Anneke 18200 Sarah 6000)
3) WRITERS WHO WENT TO JAIL $2000 (25th pick)
Jocelyn 13400 +5000 (Anneke 18200 Sarah 6000)
Overall Daily Double Efficiency for this game: 158


Unplayed clues:
J! round: None!
DJ! Round: FICTIONAL AMUSEMENT PARKS $1200 & $1600
Total $ Left On Board: $2,800


Game Stats:
Anneke $21,400 Coryat, 25 correct, 1 incorrect, 45.45% in first on buzzer, 1/1 on rebound attempts
Jocelyn $13,600 Coryat, 14 correct, 0 incorrect, 21.82% in first on buzzer
Sarah $4,000 Coryat, 11 correct, 2 incorrect, 21.82% in first on buzzer
Combined Coryat Score: $39,000
Lach Trash: $9.600 (on 8 Triple Stumpers)
Coryat lost to incorrect responses (less double-correct responses): $2,600


Anneke Garcia, stats to date:
42 correct, 2 incorrect
1/1 on rebound attempts
36.04% in first on buzzer (40/111)
1/1 on Daily Doubles (Net Earned: $4,000)
1/2 in Final Jeopardy
Average Coryat: $19,100


Anneke Garcia, to win:
3 games: 67.96%
4: 46.19%
5: 31.39%
6: 21.34%
7: 14.50%
Avg. streak: 4.122 games.


---Advertisement---


Tournament of Champions projections:
With a projected 150 regular-play games to go prior to the Tournament of Champions cutoff, after 500,000 simulations, our model shows:
An average of 4.3561 5+-time champions (standard deviation 1.7362).
An average of 7.8351 4+-time champions (standard deviation 2.1403).

An early cutoff took place 24.697% of the time (or a 5-game winner will be left out).

Anneke Garcia qualified 32.372% of the time.
Dave Leffler qualified 47.634% of the time.
Jonathan Dinerstein qualified 21.632% of the time.
Alex Schmidt qualified 8.026% of the time.
Jackie Fuchs qualified 1.280% of the time.
Mary Ann Borer qualified 0.135% of the time.


Andy’s Thoughts:

  • Sometimes a good player needs a fortuitous bounce or two in order to continue their run. I thought for sure that Anneke was going to lose today on this Final Jeopardy!, but the smaller bet in Final Jeopardy! (a bet which seemed to be designed to take Sarah out of play) worked to Anneke’s advantage.
  • That being said, Sarah’s wager was, well, not one I would have made. In general, Sarah’s best chances of winning come with a wager of $0, and every other bet in this situation lessens her chances of winning.
  • I would have been disappointed had Anneke lost, as I’ve been impressed with her breadth of knowledge over two days. Too many really good players have lost too soon over the past few months. I’m excited to see her continue her run on Monday.
  • Pickle juice gelatin? I’ll pass.

Become a Supporter now! Make a monthly contribution to the site on Patreon!


Contestant photo credit: jeopardy.com

When commenting, please note that all comments on The Jeopardy! Fan must be in compliance with the Site Comment Policy.

If you are going to quote any statistics from this page or this website, attribution is required.


Have you had a chance to listen to our new podcast game show, Complete The List, yet? Check it out! It’s also available on Apple Podcasts.



16 Comments on "Today’s Final Jeopardy – January 11, 2019"

  1. The 3 answers were – with all due respect – pathetic. None of the ladies could come up with even 1 famous physician in the 20th century? Kind of a shock! How about Jung, Fleming, Barnard (though he would have been only 16 in 1938)? DR. DALI??
    And kind of “unusual” wagers by both leading ladies, but they won Anneke the game. So Congratulations and have a nice weekend everybody!

    • I fail to see the “due respect”.
      “Whenever you are about to find fault with someone, ask yourself the following question: What fault of mine most nearly resembles the one I am about to criticize?” Marcus Aurelius, Meditations.
      You have a nice weekend too.

      • I DID know it right away and I could give you half a dozen others. Fleming, Schweitzer, Jung, Barnard, Salk,just offhand. But not a single one? If you fail to see the “due respect” you are right. There was none to be given .I was sarcastic. To not know a single worldwide physician in the first half of the 20th century IS not exactly brilliant.
        Where would we be w/o antibiotics, without polio vaccine? The world population would be probably half, maybe not even such a bad thing, given the pollution and self destruction
        mankind is inflicting. Sorry. That’s how I see it. And you can’t tell me , Jim, that you have never heard of any of those physicians?

  2. Andy, I agree that Anneke’s wager seemed to have some thought behind it, but I’m struggling to see the strategy in Jocelyn’s wager. Obviously it’s easy to say in hindsight, but wouldn’t a wager of $3001 to $6399 have served Jocelyn better? It would (likely) force Anneke to be correct, but keep her from getting beaten by Sarah.

    • I agree. It’s interesting more people don’t make defensive bets. If you are in second place, and third can’t catch you, then consider betting zero, or as you say, bet enough to catch first place if that person bets zero. I think you have to anticipate that you can’t win unless first place misses.

      In this case Anneke did not bet enough to cover Jocelyn doubling her score; however if Jocelyn had made a defensive bet of $0 or $3,001, she would be the winner.

  3. The reference to meeting in London might have thrown off the contestants – made them try to think of a British doctor.

  4. We end the week with a triple stumper.

    • Yes, Freud is almost automatically “connected” with Vienna. Fleming would have been not THAT bad a guess. Scottish, but worked in London and the time frame fits.

  5. As I was out of town, but watching, I saw a clue referencing Dru and “”Fluffy” from Despicable Me. Does someone have a screen capture of that clue? My niece would be over the moon 😉

  6. @DORIS
    “If you want to be sarcastic then have the guts to say so”.
    That makes no sense…saying you’re being sarcastic would kind of defeat the purpose, no?
    With no sarcasm then, you don’t seem nice. Your posts on this site are habitually nasty and disparaging about the contestants, and I think that’s wrong.

    • I’ve been more liberal about what I keep in the comments section in 2019, with that thought that if someone is going to be nasty towards the contestants, others will push back if they feel that the criticism is unwarranted.

      In terms of myself? I struggled mightily on this one because there was no connection in my brain between “surrealist inspiration” and “a famous doctor who might have been in London in 1938”. And when you get stuck, with time running down, you panic. And sometimes that means a blank screen.

      So go easy on the contestants.

  7. FLEMING would have been the most logical choice given the wording of the clue.
    But then you would have to know what he discovered and that was quite a while ago, didn’t even work at first. Then 2 doctors in Chicago developed it just after WWII had started (1941). Was a live saver for many GIs and others in the European theater, not to mention Korea not that long afterwards.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*


%d bloggers like this: